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Martial Arts Styles – X:


http://web.archive.org/web/20091027113829/http://geocities.com/kuseru/PMAN/StyleX.htm


XIAO HU PAI- NIGHT TIGER KUNG FU (EXCLUSIVE) By Hibik


Xiao Hu (Siao Fu) Pai, or Night Tiger Kung Fu, is a Southern Chinese art, thought to possibly have existed as far back as the Three Kingdoms Period. An old legend speaks of a group of mysterious Martial Artists known as the Night Tigers (or Xiao Hu), who were famous for appearing in the midst of battles to turn the tide. Records from several generals, including Guan Yu, and several Tang Dynasty generals, report their appearance, assistance, and subsequent disappearance when the battle was won.


The art was later passed down to a Martial Art family within Fukien province, who were apparently active rebels during the Qing Dynasty. However, the family was thought wiped out during the Boxer Rebellion, near the end when foreign soldiers were slowly retaking control of Peking.


However, there was a prominant son of the family who managed to survive, and lived to pass on his art to future generations. While it is still a pretty rare art, practiced by few, it is slowly gaining popularity in Taiwan and Southern China.


In Combat, a Master of Xiao Hu Pai will attempt to close in distance between him/her and his opponent, using his fists to attack. Being a Southern System, Xiao Hu Pai is extremely Short Hand. It's mostly grabs and punching, kicks rarely being delivered, because the legs are used for rooting. But when kicks are delivered, they tend to be powerful, sudden, quick, and below the waist. While the art itself is only taught to fairly honorable individuals, this was an art forged on the battlefield. Thus, "Fair Play" and "Honor" may only apply before the fight much of the time, if even that.


It is also a highly 'Internal' art, as the development of Chi is extremely important for without Internal Power, the system could never get close to being mastered. Being that Xiao Hu Pai was designed to face groups of enemy soldiers, so, it serves well when facing off against 3 or more opponents. Training in Xiao Hu Pai is really only available in Southern China and Taiwan.


Entrance Requirements: Limited to those of Honorable/Good Alignment.
Skill Cost: 14 Years.
Costume: Standard Kung Fu outfit, with black pants, and a white top. Wrestling Shoes OR Kung Fu shoes are also used.
Stance: Bow and Arrow Stance (Side Stance), with arms up in a position with lead arm extended into an open palm, and the other hand guarding the lead arm's armpit.
CHARACTER BONUSES Add 15 to Chi
Add 1 to M.E.
Add 2 to P.P.
Add 1 to P.E.
Add 3 to Spd
COMBAT SKILLS Attacks Per Melee: 3
Escape Moves: Roll with Punch/Fall/Impact, Maintain Balance.
Attack Moves: Leap
Basic Defense Moves: Dodge, Parry, and Auto Parry.
Advanced Defenses: Circular Parry, Combination Parry/Attack, and Power Block/Parry.
Hand Attacks: Punch, Knife Hand, Backhand, Palm Strike, and Claw Hand.
Basic Foot Attacks: Kick, Snap Kick, and Backward Sweep.
Jumping Foot Attacks: None
Special Attacks: Deathblow, Forearm, Elbow, and Knee.
Holds/Locks: Elbow Lock, Body Hold, and Wrist Lock.
Weapon Katas (Select Two): W.P. Gun (Staff), W.P. Hu Die Dao (Butterfly Sabers (Paired)), W.P. Guan Dao, W.P. Pu Dao, W.P Fu (Axe: Paired), W.P. Hu Cha (Tiger Fork), W.P. Qian (Spear), W.P. Dao (Broadsword), W.P. Jian (Straight Sword),and W.P. Hu Tou Gou (Tiger head Hooks (Paired)). Add a new weapon Kata as per O.C.C. advancement bonus, or, if none, add one at Lv. 4, 8, and 12.
Modifiers to Attack: Pull Punch, KO/Stun, Critical Strike, and Critical Strike from Rear.
SKILLS INCLUDED IN TRAINING Martial Arts Powers: Select a total of Two (2) powers from among Chi Mastery, Body Hardening Exercises, or Martial Art Techniques. If desired, any number of powers can be traded, one-for-one, for any Basic Skill Programs.
Languages: Chinese (Cantonese or Fukenese Dialect)
Physical: Running
Philosophical Training: Taoism.
Oriental: Feng Shui
If this is your primary martial art form, then the following other forms can be learned in shorter time, Bak Mei (4 years), Fong Ngan (4 Years), Pao Pat Mei (2 Years), Shaolin Kung Fu (6 years), Shantung Black Tiger (6 Years), Taijiquan (8 years), and Wui Wing Chun (7 Years),
LEVEL ADVANCEMENT BONUSES 1st: +2 to Roll with Punch/Fall/Impact, +2 to Strike, and Critical Strike from Behind.
2nd: +2 to Parry, +1 Dodge.
3rd: +15 to Chi.
4th: +1 Attack, Critical Strike on Natural 19 or 20.
5th: Select One Martial Art Power from Chi Mastery, or Martial Art Techniques
6th: +1 to Roll. +1 to Leap.
7th: Double Existing Chi.
8th: +1 Attack per Melee.
9th: Select One Martial Art Power from Chi Mastery (Including Advanced), Specialty Katas (Including Chi Katas), or Martial Art Techniques.
10th: Critical Strike on a natural 18, 19, or 20.
11th: +1 Attack per Melee, +1 to Strike and Parry.
12th: Select a Zenjorike.
13th: +1 to Maintain Balance, +1 to Damage.
14th: Double Existing Chi.
15th: Deathblow on a Natural 20.
Why Xiao Hu Pai? An effective, fast, and solid combat form, Xiao Hu Pai, while providing quite a bit of effective external power, shows it's true strength in it's powerful internal techniques, involving Chi training and use, that can prove to be a devastating combo. Xiao Hu Pai's high speed, coupled with it's Shorthand nature, makes it especially effective against Martial Art Styles and Artists who are heavily kick reliant, being able to close the gap between the two combatants and finish things up close, or extremely external, using internal power to end the conflict. Probably it's only downside is the fact it is a very rare art, taught by very few, and it is also very difficult to master.



Xing Yi Quan- Form of Intent Boxing By Hibik
Entrance Requirements: I.Q. and M.E. of 11 or higher.
Skill Cost: 15 Years (7 Years as a Secondary Martial Art.)



Xing Yi Quan, or Mind Form Fist (also translated as Shape of Will, Shape of Intention, Mind Form Boxing, Form Will Boxing, and various other translations) is the oldest of the Chinese internal 'Three Sisters' arts (followed in age by Taijiquan, and Bagua Zhang.). The most popular legend of Xing Yi's creation is that the legendary Song Dynasty general Yue Fei (who is credited as the founder of Ying Jiao Quan (Eagle Claw Boxing)) was responsible for the creation of this art. However, a more credible source of this art would be a man from Shanxi province during the late Ming and early Qing dynasties, named Ji Jike (also known as Ji Long Feng). As time went on, 2 major offshoot schools of Xing Yi were created, the Henan and the Hebei Style (which is now the most popular style). The original Shanxi style and the Henan style have much more in common then the Hebei variation. Also, while the Henan and Hebei variations are primarily external, the Shanxi style is very internal, and focused on the development of chi.



Xing Yi is a very straightforward art, following the belief that combat should be finished as quickly as it was started. Movements in Xing Yi at first appear to be very straight forward, whereas in arts such as Taiji and Bagua, movements are more circular. However, there are circular movements present in Xing Yi. Also, unlike the other two internal arts, Xing Yi's initial training is more akin to the external Chinese arts. There is an old saying in Xing Yi, "Xing Yi is like running through high grass." Which means that attacks in Xing Yi should be straight forward, as if there was no effective resistance from the opponent. Indeed, due to the power developed by Xing Yi artists, it is often as if there was nothing capable of blocking or parrying a strike. Being the most aggressive of the 'Three Sisters', Xing Yi artists will often resort to a powerful, straightforward strike, bursting through an opponent's block and striking his target with well-developed power.



The power generated from Xing Yi training is based on the principles derived from the Five Elements: Pi (Metal, Splitting), Beng (Wood, Crushing), Zuan (Water, Drilling), Pao (Fire, Pounding), and Heng (Earth, Crossing). Pi is like a falling axe. Beng is straight forward, like an arrow in flight. Zuan is fluid and flexible. Pao is like a spiraling cannonball. Heng is the use of horizontal forces. These forces form the basic techniques of Xing Yi.



In addition, there are also the 12 Animal Forms: Dragon (Long), Tiger (Hu), Monkey (Hou), Horse (Ma), Alligator (Tuo), Rooster (Ji), Hawk (Yao), Swallow (Yan), Snake (She), Tai Bird (Tai), Eagle (Ying) and Bear (Xiong). Each of these 12 forms have their strengths and weaknesses, and a Xing Yi artist must effectively combine the techniques present in all 12 forms to master fighting with this style. These forms also help develop the focus of a student's internal energy.



The development of internal energy only enhances the methods of deriving power described above. Expression of internal power is more of a progressive process in Xing Yi, compared to Bagua and Taiji. The highest level of energy expression is known as Hua Jin, which releases energy with no apparent physical force, yet easily enough force to injure or kill. At the highest level of Xing Yi, energy expression and all movements are extremely subtle, almost with an unnoticeable quality to them.



When confronted, a Xing Yi artist will stay relaxed. When attacked, he will parry or evade or parry the blow, and proceed to take the offense, going for aggressive, linear strikes utilizing subtle expression of energy. A Xing Yi artist will often attempt to finish a battle in one strike. Also, a Xing Yi Artist's preferred range is a mid range, somewhere between the range of most long ranged arts, and infighting.



Xing Yi remains probably the most rare of the 'Three Sisters' arts. Training for it is available in China, Hong Kong, or Taiwan. There are also several places in the United States that teach it as well.



Costume: Silk Kung Fu uniform.
Stance: Sancai (Three Essentials) Stance, which is a fairly low stance with most of the weight typically on the rear leg, with little to no weight on the front leg. Often, a 70/30-weight ratio is obtained. CHARACTER BONUSES Add +10 to Chi.
Add +2 to M.E.
Add+ 2 to P.P.
COMBAT SKILLS Attacks Per Melee: 2
Escape Moves: Roll with Punch/Fall/Impact, Maintain Balance.
Attack Moves: None.
Basic Defense Moves: Dodge, Parry, and Automatic Parry.
Advanced Defenses: Combination Parry/Attack, Disarm, and Power Block/Parry.
Hand Attacks: Punch (Strike), Palm, Knife Hand, Backhand, and Phoenix Eye Fist (variation of the Fore Knuckle Fist).
Basic Foot Attacks: Kick, Snap Kick, and Tripping/Leg hook.
Jumping Foot Attacks: None.
Special Attacks: Deathblow, Elbow, Forearm, Knee, and Hua Jin (SPECIAL! A sudden and subtle expression of internal energy, delivered through a hand attack. A Hua Jin, against an unarmored opponent, will deal 1D6 Hit Point damage! Against an armored opponent, Hua Jin deals 2D6 damage, bypassing armor. This can only be used once per melee, and costs 1 Chi per use.).
Holds/Locks: Wrist Lock.
Weapon Katas (Select Two): WP Jian (Sword), WP Dao (Saber/Broadsword), WP Qiang (Spear), and WP Gun (Staff).
Modifiers to Attack: Pull Punch, Knockout/Stun, Critical Strike, and Critical Strike from Rear. SKILLS INCLUDED IN TRAINING Martial Arts Powers: Select a total of TWO (2) from Chi Mastery (including Advanced), or Specialty Katas (including Chi Katas). If desired, any number of powers can be traded, one-for-one, for any Basic Skill Programs.
Languages: Chinese (Mandarin, Cantonese, or another dialect. Choose One.)
Temple: Feng Shui.
Philosophical Training: Taoism.
If this is your primary martial art form, then the following other forms can be learned in shorter time: Bak Mei (5 Years), Bagua Zhang (5 Years), or Taiji Quan (5 Years) LEVEL ADVANCEMENT BONUSES 1st: +2 to Strike, +1 to Roll with Punch/Fall/Impact.
2nd: +1 to Parry and Dodge, +1 Initiative.
3rd: +1 Attack per Melee, +1 to Damage.
4th: Double Existing Chi, +1 to Strike.
5th: Select One (1) Additional Martial Art Power from Chi Mastery (including Advanced), Martial Art Techniques, or Specialty Katas (including Chi Katas).
6th: +1 to Roll with Punch/Fall/Impact, +1 to Maintain Balance, and +1 to Parry.
7th: +1 Attack per Melee, +1 to Damage.
8th: Double Existing Chi.
9th: +1 to Strike and Parry.
10th: Select One (1) Additional Martial Art Power from Chi Mastery (including Advanced), Martial Art Techniques, or Specialty Katas (including Chi Katas), and +1 to Dodge.
11th: +1 Attack per Melee, +1 to Damage.
12th: Double Existing Chi, +1 to Strike.
13th: Select a Xian Chi.
14th: +1 Attack per Melee, +1 Parry.
15th: Select One (1) Additional Martial Art Power from Chi Mastery (including Advanced), Martial Art Techniques, or Specialty Katas (including Chi Katas).
Why Study Xing Yi Quan?A straight forward, no nonsense, aggressive approach to combat, Xing Yi provides its users with powerful, straightforward attacks, and the internal energy to back it up. Xing Yi is the aggressive art of the "Three Sisters" Internal Arts.

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